Hay box cooking

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Hay box cooking

Postby TOY80ST » Thu Aug 26, 2010 9:27 pm

This is the equivelant of a slow cooker in the scrub. Basically it is your camp oven packed in a box with hay surrounding it. It is fantastic for those that like to spend afternoons exploring. You can also do it in the ground.

What you do is prepare your meat, brown it and caramelize anything that you normally would for the slow cooker (for example onions). Do it in the base of the camp oven. Once prepared cover the meat with vegies chopped into chunks and then add your stock or flavouring completely covering the meat and vegies. Bring it to the boil add a bay leaf or two then put the lid on and place the camp oven in the haybox and pack hay or newspaper around it to keep the warmth in (heaps of it). Come back in about 6 hours take the top off and add flour and/ or gravy to thicken.

The beauty of this preparation is you can do it when you make your lunch and not worry about preparing a meal at night when it is dark.

Here is a recipe:

Teddy O'Bears Irish Stew (for 5 or 6 ppl).

Ingredients.
  • 1.2 kg chuck steak cut into cubes
  • 150 grams flour (for dusting meat and thickening)
  • 2 large onions
  • 4 potatoes
  • 1 swede
  • 2 sweet potatoes
  • 4 table spoons of olive oil
  • 2 bay leaves (don't break them up as they can get caught in your throat after cooking)
  • UHT liquid beef stock dont use beef stock cubes as they are too salty. (you could use Vigetta also)
  • 500 grams fresh beans
  • 125 grams gravy mix
Method.

Heat the camp oven on a gas ring.
Put some oil and water in the oven and brown the onions, then add the meat and brown the meat
Cut vegies into chunks (or they will fall apart if to small)
Pour all of the ingredients into the oven and make up remainder with water to "just" cover everything.
Bring to boil put on lid and simmer for 5 minutes.
Put into hay box, pack with paper and close the lid.
Come back in about 4 to 6 hours to a beautifully prepared meal. (add gravy or flour to thicken)
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Postby ST391GQ » Fri Aug 27, 2010 1:10 pm

Sounds like the huge , heavy n bulky version of a Thermos pot to me .
Just ask Jim N Tina what corned beef with all the vegies (except greens) tastes like hey:wink::wink::thumbsup:
Started at home....n sat in back of fourby for trip....cooked n ready to eat when we were ready on arrival.
Top stuff!!!!:50:

Cheers Keith
Nuthin is ever the same once I own it !
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Postby mrs beaujest » Fri Aug 27, 2010 8:49 pm

i have an old home science book that belonged to alan's mum that she used at school, and it has a section on hay-box cooking. absolutely brilliant concept.

i quote...

Advantages of Hay Box Cookery
It is an ideal method for foods that require long, gentle, even cooking. There is no likelihood of foods being burned. The busy house-keeper may leave her dinner to cook without attention whilst she goes about her work, knowing that it will be cooked when she is ready for if. When cooking by gas or electricity the use of a hay box is a great economy.

To Make a Hay Box
Choose a strong, well-made box, free from cracks, at least eight inches larger than saucepans or cans to be used in hay box. Line the whole of the box, including the lid, with several layers of newpaper, then over this neatly tack a layer of flannel or floor felt. On the bottom of the box pack in fine hay to a depth of four inches. Now place the number of saucepans or cans required in position. leaving four inches between each. Pack hay firmly around each, not leaving any space without hay, and having a thickness of at least four inches on outer sides.

When saucepans or cans are removed, a nest is left, into which saucepans are returned each time box is used.

A cushion is made of flannel or felt, and stuffed with hay until large enough to fill remaining space above the saucepans. If two saucepans are being used, it would be advisable to make two small cushions instead of one large one, otherwise foods will have to be placed in and taken out of the box at the one time. The lid should be hinged and fitted with a clasp or fastener. The outside of the box may be stained and polished to improve the appearance.

A deep tin trunk makes an ideal hay box. Newspaper balls may be used in place of hay. The best utensils for a hay box are enamelled saucepans with small handles on either side at top, or large earthenware casseroles, as these retain the heat longer. Cans may be used, but avoid iron saucepans, as these discolour food.

A specially made vessel with a tightly-fitting lid, about the size of a kerosene tin, fitted with rests on sides, may be obtained from a tin-smith. If this is used, a hot soap stone must be placed into it to heat it, then a saucepan containing boiling food is placed in it. Soap stones are obtainable at hardware shops, costing about five shillings each. The soap stone is left in the hay box all the time to help retain the heat.

Hay box cookery is cooking in stored heat, so the box must be airtight, otherwise the heat escapes and the box is useless.

Rules for Hay Box Cookery
1 All food must be at boiling point and in heated utensils when place in box.
2 The utensils used must have tightly fitting lids.
33 Do not uncover the foods until ready to be moved from box.
4 Foods take about four times the lenght of usual time to cook in hay box.
5 Foods must be reheated if necessary before serving.
6 For very large joints of meat or any food taking a very long time to cook, remove from box at end of four hours andbring to boil again before returning to box to finish cooking.

Time Table for Cooking
Food.............................................Time for Cooking Before Placing in Hay Box.................Additional Time in Hay Box

Soup.......................................................3/4 hour.................................................................. 6 hours
Fish....................................................... 5 mins.................................................................... 1/2 hour
Irish Stew.............................................. 1/2 hour meat, 5 min. with veges................................ 2 1/2 hours
Beef Stew.............................................. 3/4 hour................................................................... 3 1/2 hours
Potatoes/Vegetables............................... 5 minutes................................................................. 1 1/2 hours
Boiled Rice..............................................2 minutes................................................................. 2 hours
Stewed Fruit........................................... 2 minutes................................................................. 2 hours
Porridge................................................. 5 minutes................................................................. All night
Boiled Meat........................................... 45 minutes................................................................ 4-5 hours for 6lb. joint
Jan
xxxx


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Postby mrs beaujest » Fri Aug 27, 2010 8:57 pm

seems the table of cooking times didn't stay as a table. hope you can work it out, cause i really don't feel like typing all that again.
Jan
xxxx


Don't forget to make time for those you love and take the opportunities to make memories every single day

http://www.facebook.com/tuesdays.papers
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